Hazard Tree and Crane Removal

hazardousBeing an arborist is a dangerous profession. We take the risks very seriously and have made it our credo that safety is practiced first. To ensure this happens, we have a rigorous safety program, we have on the job mentoring where seasoned arborists supervise and instruct new arborists and we have regular safety training seminars for all employees. Not only do we take our own safety very seriously but we take the safety of our customers equally seriously. This is why we feel there is no other company who is as proficient at hazard tree removal as we are. We can do it all and we can do it efficiently.

If you are worried about your tree, please feel free to give us a call and we will be happy to send an arborist out and discuss it with you. Sometimes it is worth it just for peace of mind.

Storm Damage

storm_damageWe offer 24 Hour Emergency Service! Call our 24 Hour Emergency Pager at 604-607-1616 or during regular office hours, call 604-575-8727.

Our highly experienced crews are ready to deal with any type of hazardous tree(s). Crews are prepared prior to predicted storm events and are ready to marshal out at a moment’s notice with their equipment.

One of the greatest dangers to life and property during storms is posed by falling trees and limbs.  Growing trees will ‘catch’ more wind and become heavier, so they are prone to increased mechanical stresses, increasing the chances of failure.  Preparing trees for natural disaster is a must and should be done well in advance of the storm season. To help ease these dangers, have a professional arborist evaluate your trees.  Doing this will help you determine potential weaknesses and dangers.  See the list below to aid you in getting prepared;

Storm Damage 1  Storm Damage 2

Look at your trees for the following warning signs:

  • Wires in contact with tree branches.  Trees may become energized when they are contacted by electric wires.
  • Dead or partially attached limbs hung up in the higher branches that could fall and cause damage or injury.
  • Cracked stems and branch forks that could cause catastrophic failure of a tree section.
  • Hollow or decayed areas on the trunk or main limbs, or mushrooms growing from the bark that indicate a decayed and weakened stem.
  • Peeling bark or gaping wounds in the trunk also indicate structural weakness.
  • Fallen or uprooted trees putting pressure on other trees beneath them.
  • Tight, V-shaped forks, which are much more prone to failure than open U-shaped ones.
  • Heaving soil at the tree base is a potential indicator of an unsound root system.

Remember, too, that a tree is a living organism, and its integrity and stability change over time, so don’t assume that a tree that has survived ten severe storms will necessarily survive an eleventh.